Reuters International

Policemen stand guard in an apartment block during a search for suspects believed to have travelled to Syria to join the Islamic State, in Tingbjerg, Copenhagen, April 7, 2016. REUTERS/Uffe Weng/Scanpix Denmark

(reuters_tickers)

COPENHAGEN (Reuters) - The Danish government said on Friday it will seek to toughen laws on affiliation with terrorist organisations and stop its citizens from entering areas where such groups are in armed conflict.

The proposed bill follows the arrest on Thursday of four men suspected of having been recruited by jihadist group Islamic State and two others accused of breaking Danish weapons law.

"With the new entry ban, we address one of the biggest threats to our domestic security," Justice Minister Soren Pind said in a statement.

He also proposed increasing the maximum jail sentence for people "who let themselves be recruited for terrorism or promote terrorism in connection with armed conflicts," the ministry said.

The government lacks a majority in parliament, but last year lawmakers approved an amendment to Danish passport law, making it possible to stop citizens leaving the country if suspected of activities compromising state security.

(Reporting by Nikolaj Skydsgaard; editing by John Stonestreet)

reuters_tickers

 Reuters International