Ares-Serono hopes deal will help search for infertility treatment

One of the world's leading biotechnology companies, Geneva-based Ares-Serono, has signed an agreement with the AMRAD pharmaceutical research and development company of Australia which could lead to the development of a novel treatment for infertility.

This content was published on January 27, 2000 - 12:25

One of the world's leading biotechnology companies, Ares-Serono based in Geneva, has signed an agreement with the AMRAD pharmaceutical research and development company of Australia which could lead to the development of a novel treatment for infertility.

A statement said that under the terms of the accord, AMRAD has licensed to Ares-Serono certain patent rights and technology relating to recombinant LIF (Leukaemia Inhibitory Factor).

It added that a growing body of experimental and clinical data suggests a possible role of LIF in the process of embryo implantation.

"The causes of female infertility are multiple and in many cases difficult to ascertain," said Dr Silvano Fumeri, senior executive vice president, research and pharmaceutical development at Ares-Serono.

"Embryo implantation is one of the major causes of pregnancy failure. Addressing embryo implantation by the administration of an exogenous agent is a novel approach in assisted reproductive technology (ART)," he added.

"AMRAD is excited about working with Ares-Serono," said John Grace, managing director of AMRAD. "This alliance clearly demonstrates LIF's potential in giving a new direction to the treatment of infertility," he added.

On signing the agreement, Ares-Serono has made an undisclosed payment to AMRAD. Total payments of up to $16 million will be due based on the achievement of certain development milestones and Ares-Serono will pay royalties to AMRAD based on eventual sales of LIF pharmaceutical products.

The world leader in reproductive health, Ares-Serono is also active in growth/metabolism and multiple sclerosis/immunology. It had 1999 sales of $1.054 billion.

From staff and wire reports

This article was automatically imported from our old content management system. If you see any display errors, please let us know: community-feedback@swissinfo.ch

Share this story