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Lausanne win Swiss soccer cup

Lausanne Sports won the Swiss soccer cup on Sunday with a convincing 2-0 victory over Grasshoppers from Zurich.

This content was published on June 13, 1999 - 18:27

It was a deserved victory for Lausanne Sports over GC from Zurich.

A goal in the 34th minute by Portuguese striker Diogo set them on their way in the cup final, which was played at the Wankdorf stadium in the Swiss capital Berne.

Diogo pounced on a long clearance and gave Grasshoppers goalie Zuberbühler no chance with a drive into the far corner.

Substitute Mazzoni put the match beyond Grasshoppers' reach in the 90th minute with a simple tap-in after Zuberbühler failed to hold a shot.

Lausanne started the day as underdogs but got off to a sharp start, having two half-chances in the first 15 minutes. Grasshoppers worked their way into the game, but were hit by Diogo's goal on the break.

Lausanne could have increased their lead several times in the second half.

Striker Thurre lobbed the goalkeeper in the 55th minute only to see the ball land on top of the net.

And Mazzoni walked through the defence with just ten minutes remaining -- only to slide the ball wide with just the goalkeeper to beat.

Grasshoppers also had their chances. Tivka was always at the centre of their menace and he should have squared the match in the 60th minute with a header from just a few metres out. With just the goalkeeper to beat, his header skimmed the bar.

For Lausanne, the victory was compensation for their narrow failure to win the championship. Just ten days ago, they lost at home to Servette Geneva in the championship decider. But Lausanne have now won the cup in two consecutive years.

For Grasshoppers, the defeat marked the end to a disappointing season. Fresh from a boardroom takeover in the past week, they were looking for an early boost for their new owners. But they ended the season without any silverware, and for a change both major trophies went to clubs from French-speaking Switzerland.

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