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Should politics be kept out of sporting and cultural events?

Hosted by: Elena Servettaz

During the 2024 Eurovision Song Contest the Israeli singer Eden Golan had to be accompanied by security guards, protecting her from protesters demanding she pull out. The Russian contestant was not invited because of the war in Ukraine. Two weeks later the Cannes Film Festival became a political stage, with actors such as Cate Blanchett appearing to wear dresses in the colours of the Palestinian flag. Demonstrations at the festival called for the release of political prisoners in Russia and Israeli hostages in Gaza.

Russian athletes are only allowed to participate in the upcoming 2024 Paris Olympics as neutrals. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) is faced with whether External linkRussians should also be allowed to take part in the opening ceremony.

Cultural and sporting events are being increasingly politicised. Is this a problem? Does politics affect the objectivity of cultural and sporting events? Can the 2024 Olympics be non-political if Russian athletes are banned? Join us in this debate and share your view on whether politics should be kept out of sporting and cultural events.

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piero
piero
The following contribution has been automatically translated from FR.

It's a no-brainer to keep sports and cultural events off the political agenda!

C'est une évidence que de tenir à l'écart la politique des évènements sportifs et culturels !

César De Lucas Ivorra
César De Lucas Ivorra
The following contribution has been automatically translated from ES.

In principle, any cultural or sporting event in a country does not have to be politically linked, as it is logical that there should be legislation that sets out the rules for the authorisation, security and development of these events, complying with basic fundamental rules. It is true that cultural events, such as a film exhibition, can have a vindictive content on the part of their participants, such as a humanitarian crisis in Gaza or the war in Ukraine. But for this to happen, artists, organisers and staff of any kind at these events must allow freedom of expression and multiculturalism in the event without causing offence, but allowing criticism that, however hurtful it may be for individuals, states or entities, must be accepted. With regard to the Olympic Games, the background of the Munich Olympic bombings, together with the disasters of crowds and avalanches on football pitches, imply a very high level of security at competitions. Moreover, it is logical that the public, in a moment of exaltation, may have feelings of patriotism or otherwise, but without reaching the point of making xenophobic or otherwise degrading comments.
César De Lucas Ivorra, San Juan De Alicante, Spain.

En principio, todo acontecimiento cultural o deportivo en un país, no tiene que implicar vinculaciones políticas, ya que lo lógico es que exista una legislación que marque las normas para su autorización, seguridad y desarrollo de estos acontecimientos, cumpliendo una normas básicas fundamentales. Es vedad que los actos culturales, como una exposición de cine, pueden tener un contenido reivindicativo por parte de sus participantes, como una crisis humanitaria en Gaza o la Guerra de Ucrania. Pero para ello, tanto los artistas, organizadores como personal de cualquier tipo, en estos eventos debe permitir la libertad de expresión y la multiculturalidad, en el acto sin causar agravios, pero permitiendo críticas que por dolientes que sean para personas, estados o entidades deben ser aceptadas. Con respecto a los Juegos Olímpicos, los antecedentes de los atentados de la Olimpiada de Munich, junto con los desastres de las aglomeraciones y avalanchas en los campos de fútbol implican tener un nivel muy alto de seguridad en las competiciones. Además, el público es lógico que en un momento de exaltación, pueda tener sentimientos de patriotismo o de otro tipo, pero sin llegar a comentarios xenófobos o degradantes de otra índole.
César De Lucas Ivorra, San Juan De Alicante, España.

Fer10
Fer10
The following contribution has been automatically translated from FR.

Yes, it is.

Si.

Inbound
Inbound

Patrick Woods
A benefit of the Olympics is all countries competing with each other in a sporting arena.

sigi
sigi
The following contribution has been automatically translated from DE.

No, because sport and culture are huge businesses and influence politics as such anyway. So they have to be involved, whether they want to be or not.

Nein, Denn Sport und Kultur sind riesen Geschaefte und beeinflussen Politik als solche sowieso. Also muessen sie und werden, gewollt oder nicht, einbezogen.

Peter Ern
Peter Ern
The following contribution has been automatically translated from DE.

yes it should.

ja sie sollte.

benjaminfranklin
benjaminfranklin

yes. politics should be kept out of sports, no question about it. were already politicizing everything else.

Anonymous
Anonymous

A lot of sporting and cultural events are Business anyway and thus 'they' can exclude whoever they want.

I object to any of my taxes going to events that I have not been able to vote for, for starters, and my taxes going to sporting events/cultural events is just a form of communism anyway..

If countries/companies exclude (with the help of Politicians using force), example, Russian artists, sports people then we are no better than those countries really, are we? We talk about Democracy and how good it is while not setting a good example to Citizens in the countries 'we ban'....

Also, the Catholic Church supported Hitler during WWII !!!! and the Catholic Church is still operative here in Switzerland, BUT, no one is excluding them very much are they!!!

Cate Blanchett (and the likes of Sandra Bullock) are disgusting anti-male actresses who use boys foeskins in their beauty routine (one can easily use a search engine to confirm this). As an Australian, I think Cate Blanchett shows us what evil really looks like and I decided to sanction her films.

jamie5
jamie5

Russia invaded Ukraine with zero justification whatsoever. Should be banned and pressure applied to stop it's aggression.

Israel was attacked by a religious and fanatical militant organization that has professed that it wants Jews dead by all means possible. Their ferociousness in responding to such attacks is justifiable and the West should make sure Israel maintains the right to defend itself in an extremely hostile region.

In a rational world, we should all be celebrating our diversity but human greed and short-sightedness oftentimes supersede our best interests.

HAT
HAT

This is definitely a problem because we have endless politics shoved into our lives and sports was the last place for politics. Climate change. Wars. Gender wars. All these should not be involved in Sports.
Where else can we have a place of peace and sanity without discussing the differences in political ideologies?
Olympics is the biggest fraud. Russia / US are often disqualified to join.

Peter Ern
Peter Ern
The following contribution has been automatically translated from DE.

It doesn't bother me at all.

es stört mich gar nicht.

Rafiq Tschannen
Rafiq Tschannen

Yes. And keep things neutral. You cannot not invite Russia and at the same time invite Israel. Just ignore politics in sports totally.

gaz
gaz

It's always going to be a issue, in the world of seeking advantage and absolutely nil ethics, the single great innovation of the swiss, the magic formular and compromise as opposed a house of cards built on winks and nods and funny handshakes, so until the world embraces a few swiss values politics in sport is always going to be with us

VeraGottlieb
VeraGottlieb

Politics should be KEPT OUT of everything that hasn't to do with politics. It seems to poison what it touches.

Anonymous
Anonymous
@VeraGottlieb

Agreed!!

Unfortunately politics enters a lot of arenas because Politicians use our taxes to pay for these events...

parveenbhasin76
parveenbhasin76

yes I totally agree with the politics should be kept out of sporting and cultural events if we want to save the sporting as well as cultural spirit then politics should be kept away very far. Parveen Kumar Bhasin, India

Peter b
Peter b

Politics should have nothing to do with sport or cultural events. The treatment of the Israeli singer was terrible. The judges were biased but the voting public showed her performance was one of the best. The vast majority of sportsmen and women, and entertainers have no connection with the politics and international actions of their country. Maybe there are individuals that are doing the wrong thing such as taking drugs (swimming, cycling, soccer etc) or committing criminal offences (eg taking bribes in soccer) that should be banned regardless of which country they come from such as China, Cuba, Russia, or USA who have been involved with drugs.

VeraGottlieb
VeraGottlieb

Religion and politics DON'T mix; sports and politics SHOULD not mix; art and politics SHOULD not mix; music and politics SHOULD not mix...Mass hysteria has broken out about politicizing a daily life that used to be simple. A new way of garnering attention? Or a different way of drawing our attention from what really would matter?

ACourvoisier
ACourvoisier
The following contribution has been automatically translated from FR.

I've got a bit of a problem with the question, because it doesn't just ask, it leads by mentioning several examples where it's automatically a problem that culture is linked to politics, when it would have been more neutral to just ask the question.
There are certainly also all the cases where things are going well (such as standard operations), which are not mentioned.

-The problem is not symmetrical: I have a problem with our taxes subsidising artists with little future, so that they are told to do so, but - in the opposite direction - I have no problem with an artist expressing his position, which is typically the case with Kate Blachett wearing Palestinian colours, which you mention.

Artists are living, conscious beings, endowed with sensibility like other humans, and are citizens, and therefore have the right to express their opinion.

-By way of continuity, the Israeli singer you mention, Eden Golan, should not be deprived of EuroVision. It is the hostile demonstrators who should be expelled, which I mention despite my Gaza sympathies.

-The fact that the Russian candidate was not invited is more acceptable, because a non-invitation is not a ban (at least as it is worded), and besides, if Europe is in EuroVision, Russia is not in Europe.

-In Cannes, obviously, what happened with the demonstration was a reminder not to forget the oppressed when things are going well in our country; to read you, there was no bias other than sympathy for the oppressed. So, in my opinion, this event was innocent, and did not morally attack any actor.

-As for the Paris Olympics under a neutral banner for the Russians, it's difficult for me to decide on the right position. Obviously, we'd like to live in a world of peace, not bans.

However, here, because of the scale of these games (which won't go far, given the disorganisation in France (swimming pool too small and too expensive, so swimming in the Seine polluted, security computers stolen (there would be 3 of them, so 1 per month!), and the opening by a female rapper whose talent has not been reputed up to now), the dimension of these games, as I mentioned, inevitably has intersections with politics - however, given the low announced quality of these games as I mentioned, the fact that they are being run in a neutral rather than Russian manner will be rather flattering, in my opinion.

It's been so badly organised that these games - particularly the opening - will certainly be dangerous when seen in situ, and banning the carrying of hostile flags is perhaps also a measure of serenity and security to avoid violent movements in protest.

-As far as openness specifically is concerned, the Russians are responsible for their country, and openness is also a symbol of openness to the world - whereas I don't believe that Putin burnt Ukrainian cities to the ground to help, despite the air of misunderstood genius and planetary saviour that he has recently been given credit for. In fact, I don't believe in saviours; in people who will act in their place, or who will solve intractable international problems.

So I understand the pressure on the Russians as regards this highly symbolic event.

-But it is up to the spectator not to confuse the sportsman with the country he represents.

You have to wonder what you would have looked like if the Russians had been able to open the Olympics. Personally, it would have given me an impression of hypocrisy, or at least of something jarring.

-I'm not sure that sports and cultural entertainment is 'more politicised than it used to be', but there's a chance that it's more publicised. In my opinion, this is the result of the performance of tele-communications and the low cost of access to them, rather than any particularly new desire.

-So, my moral: It's a bit case-by-case, and of the examples cited, I can only see the hostility towards the Israeli EuroVision candidate being illegitimate, at least if she hasn't expressed extreme opinions or hatred.

I think you have to worry about being legal in the sense of the host country's forum, or International Law for the Olympics.

J'ai un petit problème avec la question, car elle ne se contente pas de questionner, mais elle oriente en mentionnant plusieurs exemples où c'est d'office un problème que la culture soit liée à la politique, alors qu'il aurait été plus neutre de juste poser la question.
Il y a aussi certainement tous les cas où cela va bien, (tel que le fonctionnement standard), et qui ne sont pas notifiés.

-La problématique n'est pas symétrique: J'ai un problème avec le fait que nos impôts subventionnent des artistes de peu d'avenir, pour qu'il soit dit de le faire, mais - dans le sens inverse - je n'ai aucun problème avec le fait qu'un artiste exprime sa position, ce qui est typiquement le cas avec Kate Blachett portant les couleurs palestiniennes, que vous mentionnez.

Les artistes sont des êtres vivants, conscients, doués de sensibilité comme les autres humains, et sont des citoyens, et ont donc le droit d'exprimer leur avis.

-Par continuité, la chanteuse israélienne que vous mentionnez, Eden Golan, n'a pas à être privée d'EuroVision. Ce sont les manifestants hostiles qui doivent être expulsés, ce que je mentionne en dépit de ma sympathie Gaza.

-Le fait que la candidate russe n'ait pas été conviée est plus acceptable, car une non-invitation n'est pas une interdiction (du moins: tel que c'est formulé), et d'ailleurs, si Europe est dans EuroVision, la Russie n'est pas dans l'Europe.

-À Cannes, visiblement, ce qui s'est passé avec la manifestation, c'est une incitation à ne pas oublier les opprimés quand tout va bien par chez nous; à vous lire, il n'y avait pas de parti-pris sinon la sympathie aux opprimés. Donc, à mon sens, cet évènement est innocent, et n'agressait pas moralement un acteur.

-Pour les Jeux olympiques de Paris sous bannière neutre pour les Russes, c'est difficile pour moi de décider la juste position. Évidemment, on aimerait être un monde de paix, et non d'interdictions.

Cependant, ici, en raison de l'envergure de ces jeux (qui ne va pas aller loin, vu la désorganisation qu'il y a eu en France (piscine trop petite et trop chère, donc natation dans la Seine polluée, ordinateurs de sécurité volés (il y en aurait 3, donc 1 par mois!), et ouverture par une rappeuse dont le talent n'est pas réputé jusqu'ici), la dimension de ces jeux, mentionnais-je, a forcément des intersections avec la politique - toutefois, vu la petite qualité annoncée de ces jeux comme je l'ai mentionné, le fait d'exercer sous manière neutre plutôt que russe sera plutôt flatteur, à mon sens.

Ça a été tellement mal organisé que ces jeux - notamment l'ouverture - seront certainement dangereux vus sur place, et interdire de porter des drapeaux hostiles est peut-être aussi une mesure de sérénité et de sécurité pour éviter des mouvements de violences en protestation.

-En ce qui est spécifiquement de l'ouverture, les Russes relèvent de leur pays, et l'ouverture est aussi un symbole d'ouverture au monde - alors que je ne crois pas que Poutine a réduit des villes ukrainiennes en cendres pour aider, malgré ses airs de génie incompris et sauveur planétaire qu'on lui prête récemment. En fait, je ne crois pas au sauveur; celui qui agira à la place de l'individu, ou qui va régler des problèmes internationaux inextricables.

Donc je comprends la contrainte sur les Russes en ce qui est de cet évènement très symbolique.

-Mais il revient au spectateur de ne pas confondre le sportif avec le pays qu'il représente.

On peut se demander quelle tête on aurait fait si les Russes avaient pu ouvrir les JO. Personnellement, ça m'aurait donné une impression d'hypocrisie, ou du moins de quelque chose de détonant.

-Je ne suis pas sûr que les divertissements de sport et culture soient "plus politisés qu'avant", mais plus médiatisés, il y a des chances. C'est la conséquence de la performance des télé-communications et de l'accès modique à celles-ci, à mon sens, plus que d'une volonté particulièrement nouvelle.

-Donc, ma morale: C'est un peu au cas-par-cas, et parmi les exemples cités, je ne vois que l'hostilité à l'encontre de la candidate israélienne de l'EuroVision à être illégitime, du moins si elle n'a pas formulé d'opinions extrêmes ou de haine.

Je pense qu'il faut s'inquiéter d'être légal au sens du for du pays hôte, ou du Droit international pour les Jeux olympiques.

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