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Meat consumption Tax on meat suggested to combat climate change



Experts say even a small tax on meat could make a big difference in consumer habits

Experts say even a small tax on meat could make a big difference in consumer habits

(Keystone)

Despite the Swiss eating less meat, environmentalists say there is more room for cutting the Swiss appetite for meat products – a move that would help lower the planet’s temperature.

meat consumption overall graphic

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Swiss meat consumption fell last year as consumers lost their appetite in particular for horse, veal and beef. But federal figures in 2016 show that per-capita consumption of meat dropped just 1.3kg between 2007 and 2013, to less than 60kg per person per year.

Switzerland should take steps to strengthen that trend, say environmentalists, who link production of meat to the production of carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping greenhouse gases.

A landmark UN reportexternal link in 2010 called for a global shift toward less consumption of animal protein to help reduce poverty and fight climate change. More recently, UN experts have recommended a tax on meat production.

Greenpeace’s Georg Klingler said he would favour a 20% to 30% meat tax, the free daily newspaper 20 Minuten reported on Tuesday. Philip Gehri of WWF said even a small tax – for meat and other products – could make a big difference by helping consumer habits become more planet friendly over the long term.

How does Switzerland compare to other countries? swissinfo.ch takes a look at meat consumption around the world.

breakdown by meat type

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