More women go back into labour force despite children

Women in Switzerland are increasingly likely to go back to work after having a child, according to a new survey. The 10-year study shows that three out of five working women in Switzerland now go back to their jobs after having their first baby.

This content was published on February 11, 2000 - 17:08

Women in Switzerland are increasingly likely to go back to work after having a child, according to a new survey. The study of the labour market over the past ten years shows that three out of five working women in Switzerland now go back to their jobs after having their first baby.

The survey published by the Federal Statistics Office says this marks a reversal of the situation twenty years ago, when only a quarter of women went back to work after the birth of their first child.

Nowadays, 62 per cent of women return to work, but only half go back to working full-time. The other half opts for part-time work. The remaining 38 per cent of mothers resign.

While the arrival of the first child considerably affects the working situation, this is less the case with second. Sixty per cent of second-time mothers remain in employment, even if in many cases it is part-time.

The labour market figures are in line with official advice that, in career-planning terms, it is better for women to remain integrated in the job world. Otherwise, officials warn, re-entry becomes difficult. More significantly, many young families depend on a double income.

However, the study also shows, that despite the warnings, most women are successful in re-entering the labour market. Only 23 per cent of women with children aged ten are not in some form of employment.

Events such as divorce or legal separation only have marginal effects on employment, leading at most to an increase in hours worked by women.

The survey also says that marriage, births, and divorce have practically no effect on the working patterns of men.

From staff and wire reports

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