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TEHRAN (Reuters) - At least 15 people were detained on Thursday during a religious ceremony in support of an Iranian reformist activist who was detained after June's disputed poll and jailed for five years, a pro-reform website reported.
The site, Mowjcamp, said the prayer event was organised by the family of the activist, Shahab-edin Tabatabaiee, and held in their home in northwestern Tehran. The jail sentence against him was announced earlier this week.
Those detained included two pro-reform journalists and the wife of Abdullah Ramezanzadeh, a former government spokesman who was himself arrested after the presidential election and accused with many others of fomenting post-vote unrest.
There was no immediate comment from the authorities, who deny opposition charges of rigging in the election, in which hardline President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad won another four-year term.
"Now ... we do not have security even in our own houses," Mowjcamp quoted Fakhrosadat Mohtashamipour as saying. She is the wife of another leading reformist detained after the election, former deputy interior minister Mostafa Tajzadeh.
The June 12 presidential election plunged Iran into its deepest internal crisis since the 1979 Islamic revolution and exposed deep establishment divisions.
Rights groups say thousands of people were detained after the vote. More than 100 people, including former senior officials such as Tajzadeh and Ramezanzadeh, remain in jail and have been put on trial.
The authorities have portrayed the huge opposition protests that erupted after the vote as a foreign-backed bid to undermine the Islamic Republic.
The opposition says more than 70 people were killed as Revolutionary Guards and Islamic militia put down the protests. The authorities estimate the death toll at about half that figure and say it includes members of the security forces.
(Editing by Richard Williams)

Reuters