External Content

The following content is sourced from external partners. We cannot guarantee that it is suitable for the visually or hearing impaired.

FILE PHOTO: A salesman arranges milk products imported from Australia at a supermarket inside IAPM mall in Shanghai, China, August 15, 2015. REUTERS/Aly Song/File Photo

(reuters_tickers)

BEIJING (Reuters) - China plans to delay a deadline for implementing new food import regulations by two years until Oct. 1 2019, a senior EU official said on Tuesday, following a lobbying effort by Europe and the United States amid concerns about disruption to trade.

The extension comes just days before the new rules, which are part of a drive by China to boost oversight of its sprawling food supply chain and announced in April 2016, were due to come into force.

Jerome Lepeintre, minister counsellor for health and food safety at the European Union delegation in Beijing, said he received official documents on Monday night confirming the decision to delay had been logged with the World Trade Organization (WTO), as required by global trade rules.

China's Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ), the agency that oversees the safety of all imports, did not respond to a fax requesting comment from Reuters.

Lepeintre said the move was "very positive" and would give exporters time to comply with the regulations, which require all food imports to carry health certificates, even if the product is deemed low-risk.

European and U.S. government and trade officials have warned the rules would hamper billions of dollars of shipments to the world's No. 2 economy of everything from pasta to coffee and biscuits.

China has delayed enforcing other tough new trade regulations this year, including rules on the cross-border retail market and cyber security, after industry pushback.

(Reporting by Dominique Patton; additional reporting by Tony Munroe; Editing by Richard Pullin)

Neuer Inhalt

Horizontal Line


swissinfo EN

Teaser Join us on Facebook!

Join us on Facebook!

subscription form

Form for signing up for free newsletter.

Sign up for our free newsletters and get the top stories delivered to your inbox.







Click here to see more newsletters

Reuters