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FILE PHOTO: French President Emmanuel Macron attends a ceremony at the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France, June 3, 2017. REUTERS/Charles Platiau/File Photo

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PARIS (Reuters) - Emmanuel Macron's popularity dropped in July to the lowest rating for a French president two months into his term, an opinion poll showed on Wednesday, in a sign that controversy over spending cuts and tax reform are taking a toll.

Forty-two percent of those surveyed by Ipsos pollsters have a positive view of Macron's action as president and as many have a negative view.

Positive ratings were down 3 points from last month and negative ones up 15 points, with more people than in June having an opinion.

Even Socialist Francois Hollande, who turned into France's most unpopular president in modern history early in his mandate, still benefited from 55 percent positive rating two months into his term, Ipsos said in a note.

Macron, who swept to power in May on promises of non-partisan rule and an end to traditional Left-versus-Right politics, has had a tough month, marked by a public row over military spending cuts with top armed forces chief General Pierre de Villiers that led to de Villiers' resignation.

Other controversies linked to his tax and spending plans have also emerged.

Macron's popularity rating remains higher than that of most French politicians, with only Environment Minister Nicolas Hulot ahead of him in Ipsos' poll.

The poll was carried out on July 21-22 among 1,022 people.

(Reporting by Ingrid Melander; Editing by Andrew Callus)

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Reuters