External Content

The following content is sourced from external partners. We cannot guarantee that it is suitable for the visually or hearing impaired.

BERLIN (Reuters) - A mosque in northwest Germany may no longer broadcast its Friday midday call to prayer by loudspeaker for now after a local court upheld a challenge by a couple who live nearly 1 km (1,000 yards) away.

The Gelsenkirchen administrative court found that the town of Oer-Erkenschwick had not assessed the local Muslim community's request properly in 2013, but a court spokesman said on Friday that this did not prevent the mosque making a new application.

The local Christian couple had argued that the call to prayers violated their own religious rights.

Anti-Muslim sentiment and support for anti-immigration policies are growing in many parts of Germany after the influx of well over a million migrants from Iraq, Syria and other mostly Muslim countries, beginning in 2015.

Huseyin Turgut, a senior official with the affected mosque, said the court's decision was disappointing.

"The call to prayer lasts for two minutes, just around 1 p.m., but only on Fridays," he said. "We've never had any complaints and we have German neighbours who are much closer - just 10 metres away."

The town's administration could not immediately be reached for comment.

(Reporting by Andrea Shalal; Editing by Kevin Liffey)

Neuer Inhalt

Horizontal Line


swissinfo EN

Teaser Join us on Facebook!

Join us on Facebook!

subscription form

Form for signing up for free newsletter.

Sign up for our free newsletters and get the top stories delivered to your inbox.








Click here to see more newsletters

Reuters