External Content

The following content is sourced from external partners. We cannot guarantee that it is suitable for the visually or hearing impaired.

A worker removes notes from cracks at the Western Wall in Jerusalem's Old city, as customary ahead of the Jewish new year August 28, 2018. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun

(reuters_tickers)

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - There's some room again in God's inbox.

Equipped with long sticks, a team of cleaners on Tuesday gouged out written prayers that visitors to Judaism’s Western Wall in Jerusalem traditionally cram into its crevices.

Twice a year, the Rabbi of the Western Wall oversees the collection of thousands of notes to ensure there’s always space for more. The papers are then buried on Jerusalem’s Mount of Olives in accordance with ritual.

The Western Wall is a remnant of the compound of the Second Temple that was destroyed in 70 AD. It stands today beneath a religious plaza known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary and to Jews as the Temple Mount.

(Writing by Jeffrey Heller; Editing by Alison Williams)

Neuer Inhalt

Horizontal Line


swissinfo EN

Teaser Join us on Facebook!

Join us on Facebook!

subscription form

Form for signing up for free newsletter.

Sign up for our free newsletters and get the top stories delivered to your inbox.








Click here to see more newsletters

Reuters