External Content

The following content is sourced from external partners. We cannot guarantee that it is suitable for the visually or hearing impaired.

Samura Kamara addresses the 72nd United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters in New York, U.S., September 22, 2017. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

(reuters_tickers)

FREETOWN (Reuters) - The losing candidate in Sierra Leone's presidential election, Samura Kamara, said the voting was marred by fraud and he plans to launch a legal challenge to the result.

Opposition candidate and former military junta leader Maada Bio was declared victor in the election late on Wednesday with 51.81 percent of votes and was sworn in hours later.

"Those results do not reflect the many concerns raised by the party about the massive ballot-stuffing, over-voting, fraudulent voter registers and other electoral irregularities," Samura Kamara said in an address on state TV after the vote was announced.

"We are challenging the results and we will be taking the appropriate legal actions to get redress and have the result overturned.

The comments from the former foreign affairs minister and ruling All People's Congress (APC) candidate follow a tense but mostly peaceful campaign to replace outgoing President Ernest Bai Koroma, who could not seek re-election due to term limits.

The relatively smooth transition came as a relief to the country of 7 million people, who in the 1990s endured a civil war fuelled by the diamond trade. Since then, its economy has been crippled by the Ebola epidemic in 2014 and 2015 and a recent slump in commodity prices.

(Reporting By Umaru Fofana,; Writing by Edward McAllister, Editing by Angus MacSwan)

Neuer Inhalt

Horizontal Line


swissinfo EN

The following content is sourced from external partners. We cannot guarantee that it is suitable for the visually or hearing impaired.

Join us on Facebook!

subscription form

Form for signing up for free newsletter.

Sign up for our free newsletters and get the top stories delivered to your inbox.







Click here to see more newsletters

Reuters