External Content

The following content is sourced from external partners. We cannot guarantee that it is suitable for the visually or hearing impaired.

South Sudan's President Salva Kiir attends the 28th Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the Heads of State and the Government of the African Union in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa, January 30, 2017. REUTERS/Tiksa Negeri

(reuters_tickers)

Khartoum (Reuters) - Sudan on Monday warned South Sudan to cease its support of rebel groups at war with Khartoum, accusing its president of meeting with rebels last week in a rare public statement from Khartoum's intelligence agency.

Sudan regularly accuses its neighbour of backing insurgents in the Darfur, Blue Nile and South Kordofan regions that run along its southern border.

South Sudan split away from Sudan in 2011 after decades of civil war fuelled by ethnic divides and disputes over oil.

Monday's statement was exceptional for pinning blame directly on South Sudan's president, potentially suggesting an escalation of tension between the neighbouring states.

The National Intelligence and Security Service statement said that "... since last Wednesday and until Saturday, April 22, the president of South Sudan ... and several executive branch leaders and security officials held intensive meetings with leaders of the so-called northern sector in Juba".

Sudan has intermittently threatened to close its border with South Sudan if it continued to support rebel groups, an allegation Juba denies.

"We warn the government of the south and demand that they stop immediately their interference in Sudanese affairs," the statement added.

(Reporting by Khalid Abdelaziz; Writing by Eric Knecht; Editing by Jonathan Oatis)

Neuer Inhalt

Horizontal Line


subscription form

Form for signing up for free newsletter.

Sign up for our free newsletter and get the top stories delivered to your inbox.

swissinfo EN

The following content is sourced from external partners. We cannot guarantee that it is suitable for the visually or hearing impaired.

Join us on Facebook!

Reuters