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FILE PHOTO: A man purported to be the reclusive leader of the militant Islamic State Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi has made what would be his first public appearance at a mosque in the centre of Iraq's second city, Mosul, according to a video recording posted on the Internet on July 5, 2014, in this still image taken from video. REUTERS/Social Media Website via Reuters TV

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said on Friday the United States could not prove that Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi was dead.

Earlier this week, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said it had "confirmed information" that Baghdadi had been killed, but Western and Iraqi officials have been sceptical.

"If we knew, we would tell you. Right now, I can't confirm or deny it," Mattis said. "Our approach is we assume that he's alive until it is proven otherwise, and right now, I can't prove it otherwise."

Mattis added that a ceasefire in southwestern Syria was holding so far.

The United States, Russia and Jordan announced the ceasefire and a "de-escalation agreement" for the southwest after a meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany.

"What is happening further down in southwest is something that we will support obviously, but right now, we don't have any equity in it, that is a State Department, diplomatic lead, President to President effort," Mattis said.

(Reporting by Idrees Ali; Editing by Bernadette Baum)

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