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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Communications Commission on Tuesday faulted the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency's procedures over a false emergency alert on January 13 of a pending missile attack that prompted widespread panic.

The false alarm, which went uncorrected for 38 minutes after being transmitted to mobile phones and broadcast stations, caused widespread panic across the Pacific islands state. The FCC said a miscommunication in part led to mistake. The employee who transmitted the alert said in a written statement to Hawaii that he or she believed it was an actual alert.

(Reporting by David ShepardsonEditing by Chizu Nomiyama)

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Reuters