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FILE PHOTO: A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor is launched during a successful intercept test, in this undated handout photo provided by the U.S. Department of Defense, Missile Defense Agency. U.S. Department of Defense, Missile Defense Agency/Handout via Reuters/File Photo

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SEOUL (Reuters) - The U.S. military has started moving parts of the controversial THAAD anti-missile defence system into a planned deployment site in South Korea, Yonhap news agency reported on Wednesday, amid high tensions over North Korea's missile and nuclear programmes.

The United States and South Korea have agreed to deploy THAAD in response to the threat of missile launches by North Korea but China says it will do little to deter the North while destabilising the regional security balance.

Trailer trucks carrying parts of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defence (THAAD) system entered the site on what had been a golf course in the county of Seongju in a southern region of South Korea, Yonhap news agency and YTN television reported.

South Korean defence ministry officials and U.S. military officials could not immediately be reached for confirmation.

The United States began moving the first elements of the advanced missile defence system into South Korea in early March after the North test-launched four ballistic missiles.

But the U.S. and South Korean militaries have been reluctant to publicly discuss the progress of the deployment as candidates in a May 9 presidential election debated whether the move should go ahead or be delayed until after the vote.

South Korea has said China has discriminated against some South Korean companies in retaliation against the deployment.

(Reporting by Jack Kim; Editing by G Crosse and James Dalgleish)

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