External Content

The following content is sourced from external partners. We cannot guarantee that it is suitable for the visually or hearing impaired.

Giant spider webs, spun by long-jawed spiders (Tetragnatha), cover sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun

(reuters_tickers)

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - On the banks of a creek near Jerusalem stands an enchanted forest, its trees shrouded by giant cobwebs woven by long-jawed spiders.

    Science and nature combined to create the unusual sight: the Soreq creek largely contains treated sewage full of nutrients that promote the proliferation of mosquitoes that serve as a source of food for spiders, which then reproduce in multitudes.

    "It's an exceptional case," said arachnophile Igor Armicach, a doctoral student at Hebrew University’s Arachnid Collection.

    He said millions of long-jawed spiders created the webbing that envelops the forest, a phenomenon rarely seen in the Middle East.

    But while spider egg sacs and spiderlings are everywhere along the banks of the creek, the future is bleak. Colder temperatures will soon cause a drastic drop in the mosquito population that sustains the web-weavers.

(Reporting by Elana Ringler; Writing by Jeffrey Heller; Editing by Gareth Jones)

Neuer Inhalt

Horizontal Line


subscription form

Form for signing up for free newsletter.

Sign up for our free newsletters and get the top stories delivered to your inbox.







Click here to see more newsletters

swissinfo EN

The following content is sourced from external partners. We cannot guarantee that it is suitable for the visually or hearing impaired.

Join us on Facebook!

Reuters