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Swiss fall behind in Davis Cup

Federer and Rosset were beaten in four sets Keystone

Defeat for Roger Federer and Marc Rosset in Saturday's doubles has left the Swiss team struggling in their Davis Cup tie with Russia.

This content was published on February 9, 2002 - 14:46

Federer and Rosset were unable to overcome the top ten pairing of Yevgeny Kafelnikov and Marat Safin on the Moscow clay, losing the doubles rubber in four sets (2-6, 6-7, 7-6, 6-2).

Following Friday's singles action, Switzerland are now trailing Russia 2-1 with just two singles matches left to play on Sunday.

After failing to find their rhythm in the first set, the Swiss pair put up more of a fight in the second and even managed to break 4-2 ahead. But Kafelnikov and Safin pulled back level in the next two games and profited from some Swiss inconsistency to clinch the second set tie-break 8-6.

At 5-4 down in the third set, Federer and Rosset were able to defend four match points against Federer's serve thanks mainly to some inspirational net play from Rosset. Having come through those nervous moments, the Swiss duo seemed momentarily re-energised, going on to win the subsequent tie-break 7-0.

The Russians weren't to be denied, however. Rediscovering their confidence at the start of the fourth set, Kafelnikov and Safin broke twice to storm into a 4-0 lead. Federer and Rosset held their next two service games but were unable to stop the Russian pair from wrapping up the match in two hours and 43 minutes.

If they are to complete an unlikely overall victory over the strong Russian side, the Swiss team will now have to win both the singles rubbers on Sunday. Federer is set to take on Kafelnikov while Swiss number two Michel Kratochvil meets Safin.

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