Navigation

Skiplink Navigation

Main Features

Ogi warns army reform won't come cheap

The defence minister, Adolf Ogi, has warned that his proposed army reforms are not likely to lead to a reduction in military spending. Ogi told Le Temps newspaper that the smaller-scale army could cost even more than its present-day equivalent.

The defence minister, Adolf Ogi, has warned that his proposed army reforms are not likely to lead to a reduction in military spending. Ogi told Le Temps newspaper that the smaller-scale army could cost even more than its present-day equivalent.

Under the plans the number of troops serving in the army will be reduced from 360,000 to around 200,000. However, Ogi insisted this would not necessarily mean a reduction in the army's budget.

"The new army must be equipped with the most up-to-date and sophisticated equipment," he told the newspaper.

Socialist parties have been pressing for a ten-year reduction in military spending, an issue which is likely to go a referendum in November. But Ogi's comments also follow pressure from parties on the right, who have been demanding a credible national defence.

The cabinet is due to vote on the proposed army reforms by the end of May.



Neuer Inhalt

Horizontal Line


WEF 2018

WEF Teaser 2018

WEF 2018

subscription form

Form for signing up for free newsletter.

Sign up for our free newsletters and get the top stories delivered to your inbox.







Click here to see more newsletters

×