Direct democracy Switzerland: How To
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Swiss citizenship laws have undergone dramatic changes in the past 20 years. For one, a Swiss woman no longer loses her citizenship for marrying a foreigner.

To become Swiss, there are basically three paths: through birth, marriage (not automatic) or naturalisation. This section concerns those who would like to become Swiss or to reclaim their Swiss citizenship, both of which can require a lengthy process.

Unlike in the United States, Switzerland does not grant a child citizenship for being born on Swiss soil. A person is automatically Swiss if he or she is the child of married parents, at least one of whom is Swiss. The child of an unmarried Swiss woman is also automatically Swiss. Should an unmarried father be Swiss (and the mother a foreigner), the child can have Swiss citizenship as long as the father acknowledges paternity before the child turns legal age.

Switzerland allows citizens to hold multiple nationalities, so whether a naturalised person loses previous citizenship depends entirely upon the other country in question.

For general information about becoming Swiss, see the State Secretariat for Migration.

Regular naturalisation

Foreigners with no direct blood ties to Switzerland through either birth or marriage must currently live in the country for at least 12 years before they can apply for citizenship. Years spent in the country between ages ten and 20 count double. A new law reducing the number of years of residence from 12 to 10 was passed by Parliament in June 2014 and is expected to go into effect at the beginning of 2017.

The person must be well integrated, familiar with customs and traditions, law abiding, and pose no threat to internal or external security.

The State Secretariat for Migration will then “green light” an applicant’s request to begin the naturalisation process but that does not mean citizenship is certain. Rather, cantons and municipalities have their own requirements that must be met. One canton, for example, might require applicants to live for two years in the region while another might require a decade. For more on the process, please visit the State Secretariat for Migration.

Facilitated naturalisation

Foreigners married to a Swiss citizen or children of one Swiss parent (who do not yet have Swiss citizenship) are eligible to apply for fast-track citizenship. The person must be well integrated, law abiding and not endanger Switzerland’s external or internal security. Cantons and municipalities have no additional requirements that must be met but do reserve the right of appeal.

This rule generally applies to foreign spouses married to a Swiss for at least three years and who have lived in Switzerland for a total of five years, including the year immediately prior to application. People “with close ties” to Switzerland may also apply for the fast-track procedure even if they live abroad. In that case, the couple must have been married for at least six years. The spouse must have had Swiss citizenship before getting married.

Children who are not yet 22 years old and who did not get citizenship when their parents did may also apply, provided they have lived in the country for at least five years – including for one year prior to making the application. “Close ties to Switzerland” also applies (owning real estate in the country is not enough). For children born out of wedlock to Swiss fathers, an application for citizenship must be filed before the child turns 22 and the father must recognise the child as his. The child must have close links to the country.

For more on facilitated naturalisation, please visit the State Secretariat for Migration.

Renaturalisation

The process of becoming Swiss again generally applies to foreign spouses of Swiss nationals and foreign children who lost citizenship through forfeiture, marriage or another release from Swiss nationality.

A woman who formerly held Swiss citizenship and lost it when her husband relinquished his Swiss citizenship before January 1, 2006 (the date when the amendment of the Swiss Citizenship Act went into effect) can still have her citizenship reinstated. She can apply for reinstatement of Swiss citizenship if she has close ties to Switzerland. It is irrelevant whether her Swiss citizenship was acquired by descent, adoption, naturalisation or marriage.

As with other types of naturalisation, the applicant must be well integrated, law abiding and pose no threat to Switzerland’s internal or external security. Other requirements, such as age limits or place of residence, can come into play. For more information, please visit the State Secretariat for Migration.

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