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Out & About in Switzerland: The British cars are coming!

Keith Wynn

The picturesque lakeside town of Morges near Lausanne is going to be the setting for a traffic jam of a very unique kind. On October 7, more than 1,000 classic British cars will be bumper to bumper on the Morges quayside.

This content was published on September 29, 2000 - 17:07

Motoring enthusiasts from across Europe will descend on the town with their classic cars and motorcycles for the "9th Classic British Car Meeting". They will be driving everything from old Austins and Rolls-Royces, 1960s racing Jaguars and Triumph and Royal Enfield motorbikes.

Thousands of curious spectators are expected to join them. More than 10,000 people were in attendance last year.

The organiser of the event, Keith Wynn, describes classic British cars as "one of the sceptred isle's most formidable exports, as witnessed by the large number of them seen on the roads and by-ways throughout Europe".

Entrance to the event is free of charge and all drivers will receive a souvenir prize. There will also be special awards for the oldest car and motorcycle.

The 700-year-old town of Morges, with its cobblestone streets and alleys, is also worth discovering. Artful wrought iron signs created by a local blacksmith are hung from most shop fronts. The regular Saturday market in the old town will coincide with the car event.

The town also houses a renowned museum of historical figurines and the Alexis Forel Museum, showcasing furnishings dating back to the 15th century and temporary art exhibitions.

If the day is clear, visitors to the car meeting are advised to pull themselves away from the gleaming hubcaps and polished fenders for a moment to catch a glimpse of Mont Blanc rising up in the distance. The Morges quayside is one of the few locations on Lake Geneva affording such a splendid view.

The "9th Classic British Car Meeting" gets underway at 10 o'clock in the morning and ends at five in the afternoon.

swissinfo

Out & About in Switzerland is updated regularly to keep you informed of upcoming events, which may provide a different insight into the country and its people.

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