Navigation

Skiplink Navigation

Main Features

Three hurt Cars swept away by Swiss alpine pass avalanche

A red helicopter flies in the mountains

The injured trio were airlifted to local hospitals.

(Keystone)

Three people have been hurt after an avalanche swept away two cars attempting to cross an alpine pass in Switzerland on Sunday. All three were taken to hospital where their condition is described as non-life threatening.

The incident took place at around 2pm on the Klausen Pass that connects cantons Uri and Glarus in central Switzerland. At nearly 2,000 meters high, the mountain pass is still affected by snow and had only opened for road traffic earlier in the week.

Canton Uri police report that the avalanche struck 200 metres from the top of the pass, sweeping about 100 metres down the road. The injured car occupants were airlifted to hospital and a fourth passenger escaped from the incident unhurt.

Unusually high snowfall in the winter has resulted in several avalanches in Switzerland, including some fatalities at ski resorts. Four skiers were killed in canton Valais in March during one of the worst incidents.

Up until April 30, a total of 26 people – all involved in winter sports – died in 19 separate avalanche incidents last winter, according to the Swiss Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research. The average death toll is 21. 

Overall, some 250 “destructive avalanches causing property damage or personal injury” were reported.

In January, thousands of tourists were cut off for days in the popular resort of Zermatt while Andermatt and Saas-Fee were also affected by avalanches. The avalanche risk alert reached its highest level several times in the Swiss Alps over the winter.

Police have now closed the Klausen Pass until further notice as they assess the risk of further avalanches.

swissinfo.ch/mga

Neuer Inhalt

Horizontal Line


External Content

Survey

Umfrage

subscription form

Form for signing up for free newsletter.

Sign up for our free newsletters and get the top stories delivered to your inbox.









Click here to see more newsletters