Navigation

Federer poised to fight back at Gstaad Open

Federer in action at Wimbledon Keystone Archive

"It's tough at the top" as the saying goes, and the ATP tour is no exception. Hot on the heels of Wimbledon the stars of the tennis world are meeting again in Gstaad for the Swiss leg of tennis's grand tour.

This content was published on July 5, 2001 - 16:55

The UBS tournament in the Bernese Oberland flings open its doors on July 7, offering a hearty welcome home to Swiss number one, Roger Federer, following his quarterfinal defeat at Wimbledon on Wednesday.

Swiss tennis's rising star lost to home favourite, Tim Henman, 5-7, 6-7,6-2, 6-7.

Despite bitter disappointment, the 19-year-old left the British tournament knowing he had added another strong performance to his best ever season.

The Basel teenager hit the headlines when he knocked out tennis legend, Pete Sampras, in the fourth round putting an end to the American's dream of a record breaking eighth Wimbledon victory.

Pundits predict that Federer will be the one to watch in Gstaad, as he fights back from his Wimbledon defeat, eager to get another ATP title under his belt to add to his Milan victory earlier this year.

The Gstaad Open has a sentimental appeal for the Swiss number one as it was here that he made his professional debut in 1998, when he was ATP ranked 702. But Federer has risen steadily though the ranks since he first rallied on Gstaad's clay courts and is now being hailed a star of the future.

Following this season's dazzling performances at Wimbledon, Milan and the Davis Cup, where he led Switzerland to a clear victory against the United States, he is sure to better his current 15 ATP ranking.

As for Gstaad, Federer has everything to play for and his consistent performances and sheer determination may well secure him another ATP title.

swissinfo

This article was automatically imported from our old content management system. If you see any display errors, please let us know: community-feedback@swissinfo.ch

Comments under this article have been turned off. You can find an overview of ongoing debates with our journalists here. Please join us!

If you want to start a conversation about a topic raised in this article or want to report factual errors, email us at english@swissinfo.ch.

Share this story

Join the conversation!

With a SWI account, you have the opportunity to contribute on our website.

You can Login or register here.