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Switzerland remains second most globalised nation

Switzerland has been ranked number two for the second year in succession in a survey of the world's most globalised countries.

This content was published on January 13, 2003 - 16:30

The third annual Globalisation Index revealed that only the Republic of Ireland performed better in 2001.

The index - jointly compiled by the management consulting firm, AT Kearney, and Foreign Policy Magazine - measures economic, social, political and technological integration in 62 countries, using available data through to the end of 2001.

Switzerland's second place was mainly due to the widespread use of the Internet, the country's attraction as an international financial centre and the increase in political integration.

It was also found that Swiss citizens have a lot of personal contacts abroad and made on average 1.85 trips abroad in 2001.

However, economic integration declined in Switzerland with direct investment plunging from $59.2 billion (SFr82.1 billion) in 2000 to $35.1 billion in 2001.

Ireland's high score was the result of a strong performance in global social integration, as well as its robust trade and investment links with the rest of the world.

September 11

The Globalisation Index also showed that overall levels of integration continued to climb in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks and a prolonged global economic slowdown.

However, this improvement came at a much slower pace than in previous years.

But the index showed that political engagement had deepened as a result of international cooperation in the war against terrorism and the continued integration of China and Russia into the world economy.

Switzerland was followed by Sweden, Singapore and the Netherlands. The United States finished in 11th place, up one place on last year.

swissinfo with agencies

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