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WEF guests wowed by Swiss flavours

One of Switzerland's top chefs, Anton Mosimann, has charmed delegates at the World Economic Forum in New York with a mouth-watering array of Swiss cuisine.

This content was published on February 2, 2002 - 15:21

Mosimann, aided by a personal crew of six assistants and more than 100 chefs, served up Swiss dishes, such as "Rösti" and "Raclette", to around 1,000 diners at the Waldorf Astoria.

"I was asked to use Swiss ingredients as much as possible," the Davos cook told swissinfo. "But I also had to include local ingredients."

The evening began with a selection of hors-d'oeuvres, followed by a typical sliced veal dish, known as "émincé de veau zurichoise". Vegetarians were able to find solace in a cheese buffet and a risotto, which was specially prepared in the dining room.

"We took into account the nationalities and the different religions," Mosimann explained. "Everything was very carefully planned."

The meal ended with a dessert buffet, featuring typical Swiss chocolates and petits-fours.

Guest chef

Mosimann, who has a private dining club in London called "Mosimann's", has been involved as a guest chef at the WEF for the past two years. He says he got the job thanks to his reputation and through contacts in London and New York.

"I'm a very lucky man and very happy to be a part of this event," he said.

Mosimann was born in 1947 in the Jura mountains, the only child of Swiss restaurant owners. He spent his early years in Nidau, near Biel, helping his parents to run their business, where he developed both a love for food and a desire to become a cook.

After an apprenticeship at a local hotel, Mosimann became a fully-fledged professional chef at the age of 25. From then on, he travelled extensively, gaining international acclaim in Italy, Canada and Japan.

In 1975, Mosimann joined London's Dorchester Hotel where he became the youngest ever Maître Chef de Cuisine. Thirteen years later, and with a wealth of experience behind him, he set up on his own.

by Jeff Nottage

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