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Out & About in Switzerland: Folklore fever in St Moritz

Dress and Dance is the theme of this year's Ethno Festival. Graubünden Tourism

The exclusive resort of St Moritz is taking on a new image. Known as the playground for the rich and famous, it will be the centre of an event (October 6 to 8) in the Engadine celebrating alpine customs.

This content was published on September 29, 2000 - 17:08

The organisers say the "Ethno Festival" will be a celebration of customs from across the Alps - from Switzerland to Slovenia.

The Austrian band, the "Original Tiroler Kaiserjägermusik", will provide one of the musical highlights. It was formed nearly 200 years ago to greet Emperor Franz on his return from Paris. There will also be performances by musical groups and dance troupes from northern Italy, Slovenia, eastern Switzerland and the Engadine valley.

A unique collection of 26 puppets, each one representing the traditional dress of every Swiss canton, will be on display at the "Konzertsaal St Moritz Bäder", alongside original costumes from Graubünden.

Dressmakers and other artisans will lead workshops revealing some of the secrets behind the making of traditional costumes and other handicrafts found in the Alps.

Prominent ethnologists will enlighten guests with their views on the similarities of customs found across the region.

A separate exhibition will provide an insight into the role alpine traditions played in advertising in the first half of the 20th century. At the time, it was a tried and true formula to print posters of folklore scenes in order to sell just about anything.

Watchmaker and fashion designer, Michel Jordi, will be one of the guests of honour at the Ethno Festival. He's made his fortune selling a line of watches and clothes decorated with traditional Swiss designs and patterns - proving that the time is right for such an event.

swissinfo

Out & About in Switzerland is updated regularly to keep you informed of upcoming events, which may provide a different insight into the country and its people.

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