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PARIS (Reuters) - The situation in Iran is dangerous and France is worried by a police crackdown against opposition demonstrators in Tehran, French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner said Wednesday.
Kouchner also told reporters that major powers were still waiting for a response from Tehran over their offers to enrich Iranian uranium, but said it would be up to the United States to decide when to set a deadline for any a response.
"None of this bodes well. I hope that I am wrong, but a government that represses its people at home and refuses dialogue abroad does not bode well," Kouchner said.
"The situation is dangerous in a Middle East which is dangerous," he said.
Police clashed with crowds in Tehran Wednesday when a rally marking the 30th anniversary of the storming of the U.S. embassy turned violent.
The internal strife in Tehran takes place against a backdrop of international tension over Iran's nuclear program, which many Western countries believe is aimed at developing a bomb.
Iran denies this but talks with the powers on its nuclear ambitions have made little headway.
Iran said earlier this week that it wanted more discussions over a U.N.-drafted nuclear deal for it to export its uranium abroad for processing, but Koucnher said the powers were still awaiting a formal response.
"They are not answering us. What are we expected to do. Wait? Yes, we are waiting, but not until the end of the world," Kouchner said, speaking in English.
France has previously said Iran should have until the end of the year to respond to concerns or else face new sanctions.
However, Kouchner said there was no fixed deadline.
"It depends on our American friends, mainly, because they started this new step in political talks. They wanted to develop direct talks with the Iranians and we are highly supportive of our American friends," he said.
(Reporting by Crispian Balmer; editing by James Mackenzie)

Reuters