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How can Swiss trains survive low-cost airlines?

Hosted by: Sara Pasino

Greenpeace has recently announced that train travel from Switzerland to other European cities is more expensive than flights on 70% of the routes assessed.

Train travel is more eco-friendly than flights, but can railway travel compete with cheaper flights?

What are your experiences with Swiss trains? Join the discussion!

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pvrossi
pvrossi
The following contribution has been automatically translated from IT.

The issue of cost has always been very critical for railways: it is basically a quasi-monopoly (particularly in Switzerland) and this does not help to keep costs down. The basic infrastructure has very high financial costs so an overall economic assessment generally does not allow for lowering the cost of tickets to be competitive with air travel.

The issue of competition is very important: some competition can be achieved between carriers on the long distance (e.g., in Italy, competition between Italo and Trenitalia has resulted in significant lowering of average fares) but at the local/regional level it is virtually impossible to have multiple operators competing with each other.

In addition, the infrastructure is a natural monopoly and the associated cost must be paid by all carriers but remain confined within limits to allow affordable ticket prices paid by travelers.

Finally, the great advantage of having a single global pricing for all public transport in Switzerland, which offers travelers a great ease of access to the service, must be preserved.

An interesting idea I think can be borrowed from Japan, the only country in the world with which Swiss railways can compare in frequency, ubiquity and punctuality: given the total absence of public subsidies (imposed by constitutional law) the railway companies have transformed stations into immense commercial and service areas so that, getting off the train, in a few minutes you find an endless variety of stores, shopping centers, restaurants, museums, hotels, coworking spaces, etc. Thanks to this incredible range of services, it is truly possible to run economic activities without having to travel by car at all with great benefit to the environment and also quality of life.

In this regard Swiss stations do not seem to me to have fully developed this potential yet, there are yes important examples (Luzern, Zurich) but in many cases I think one could "push" the offer much further.

Finally, I think it is worth studying in depth the example of the payment cards that the Japanese railways issue to simplify all payments: the various cards called Suica, Icoca, Pasmo, etc. issued by the banks linked to the railway companies; these cards are very widely used and in practice allow for an additional very large inflow of capital that comes directly into the accounts of the railway companies and ensures their financial stability. Compared to the Swiss system (e.g., Twint), the advantage is that it is the railroads that own the banks that issue these payment cards and not the latter that finance the former...all of which results in greater financial stability and sustainability of the system.

So if Switzerland wants to ensure the future economic stability of the rail network, I think the first point lies in ensuring adequate capital inflows without incurring the heavy debt interest of the various forms of loans conventionally operated by the banks. The flow must be reversed, it is not the railroads serving the banks but exactly the opposite, that is, the latter serving the railroads, a fundamental instrument for ensuring a fundamental right of citizens such as freedom of movement.

Il tema dei costi è sempre stato molto critico per le ferrovie: si tratta sostanzialmente di un quasi-monopolio (in particolare in Svizzera) e questo non aiuta a contenere i costi. L'infrastruttura di base ha costi finanziari elevatissimi per cui una valutazione economica globale non consente in genere di abbassare il costo dei biglietti per essere competitivo con l'aereo.

Il tema della competizione è molto importante: si può realizzare una qualche competizione tra vettori sulla lunga distanza (ad esempio in Italia la competizione tra Italo e Trenitalia ha comportato significativi abbassamenti delle tariffe medie) ma a livello locale/regionale è praticamente impossibile avere più gestori in concorrenza tra di loro.

Inoltre l'infrastruttura è un monopolio naturale e il relativo costo deve essere pagato da tutti i vettori ma restare confinato entro limiti tali da consentire prezzi accessibili per i biglietti pagati dai viaggiatori.

Infine va salvaguardato il grande vantaggio di avere in Svizzera un'unica tariffazione globale per tutto il trasporto pubblico che offre ai viaggiatori una grande facilità di accesso al servizio.

Un'idea interessante credo possa essere mutuata dal Giappone, unico Paese al mondo con cui le ferrovie svizzere possano confrontarsi per frequenza, capillarità e puntualità: vista la totale assenza di contributi pubblici (imposta per legge costituzionale) le compagnie ferroviarie hanno trasformato le stazioni in immense aree commerciali e di servizio per cui, scendendo dal treno, in pochi minuti trovi un'infinita varietà di negozi, centri commerciali, ristoranti, musei, alberghi, spazi di coworking, ecc. Grazie a questa incredibile offerta di servizi è veramente possibile gestire attività economiche senza minimamente doversi spostare in auto con grande vantaggio per ambiente e anche qualità della vita.

Al riguardo le stazioni svizzere non mi pare abbiano ancora sviluppato a fondo questo potenziale, vi sono si esempi importanti (Luzern, Zurigo) ma in molti casi credo si potrebbe "spingere" l'offerta molto oltre.

Infine, credo valga la pena di studiare a fondo l'esempio delle carte di pagamento che le ferrovie giapponesi emettono per semplificare tutti i pagamenti: le varie tessere denominate Suica, Icoca, Pasmo, ecc. emesse dalle banche collegate alle compagnie ferroviarie; queste tessere sono utilizzatissime e in pratica consentono un ulteriore ingentissimo afflusso di capitali che arrivano direttamente nei conti delle compagnie ferroviarie e ne assicurano la stabilità finanziaria. Rispetto al sistema svizzero (es. Twint) il vantaggio è che sono le ferrovie a possedere le banche che emettono questi titoli di pagamento e non queste a finanziare le prime... il tutto si traduce in maggiore stabilità finanziaria e sostenibilità del sistema.

Se dunque la Svizzera desidera assicurare la stabilità economica futura della rete ferroviaria credo il primo punto stia proprio nell'assicurare un adeguato afflusso di capitali senza incorrere nei pesanti interessi a debito delle varie forme di prestito operate convenzionalmente dalle banche. Va invertito il flusso, non sono le ferrovie al servizio delle banche ma esattamente il contrario, ovvero queste al servizio delle ferrovie, fondamentale strumento per assicurare un diritto fondamentale dei cittadini quale la libertà di movimento.

Participant 8815 (pa8815)
Participant 8815 (pa8815)
The following contribution has been automatically translated from DE.

The people in charge will have to think about that. My conclusion, if you're interested:

- The last time by plane: Fall 1999, overseas
- The last time by train: The day before yesterday, regional

When I once thought about taking a longer trip by ship, I had to hear from a "colleague", who nota bene, takes up to 2 long-distance flights per year, that this is gross environmental pollution. (One calculates 22 years x 2 flights.) It finds itself again and again a cheap excuse why others are worse. That's how people tick.

I have nevertheless refrained from the ship journey for the time being, although for other reasons.

If traveling should really be in favor of the environment, then the train is hard to beat.

Das müssen sich die Verantwortlichen überlegen. Mein Fazit, falls es interessiert:

- Das letzte mal mit dem Flugzeug: Herbst 1999, Übersee
- Das letzte mal mit der Bahn: Vorgestern , regional

Als ich mir einst überlegte mal eine länger Schiffsreise zu unternehmen musste ich von einem "Kollegen", der notabene bis zu 2 mal pro Jahr Weitstreckenflüge unternimmt hören, dass sei grobe Umweltverschmutzung. (Man rechne 22 Jahre x 2 Flüge.) Es findet sich immer wieder eine billige Ausrede warum andere schlimmer sind. So ticken die Leute.

Von der Schiffsreise habe ich vorerst dennoch abgesehen, wenn auch aus anderen Gründen.

Wenn Reisen wirklich zugunsten der Umwelt sein soll, dann ist die Bahn nur schwer zu schlagen.

Wolfgang Frielassing
Wolfgang Frielassing

Cost must come down; also comfort could be improved very easily: airflow in the newer trains is terrible and should be improved; it is impossible to open windows and ventilation is so minimal that the space is uncomfortable when busy (and also unhealthy according to indoor air quality standards).

GianLuca
GianLuca
The following contribution has been automatically translated from IT.

Rail transport must focus its efforts by aiming to be more competitive and less dependent on direct government aid. Rail congestion, operational efficiency and reliability, structural and competitive matrix problems, and safety issues are other challenges that will necessarily have to be addressed to compete with airlines in general.

Il trasporto ferroviario deve concentrare i propri sforzi puntando a essere più competitivo e meno dipendente dagli aiuti pubblici diretti. Congestione ferroviaria, efficienza e affidabilità operativa, problemi strutturali e di matrice competitiva, nonché in materia di sicurezza, sono altre sfide che dovranno necessariamente essere affrontate per competere con le compagnie aeree in generale.

Anton Huggler
Anton Huggler

Wenn in der Schweiz, reise ich ausschliesslich mit der Bahn. Zudem interessiert mich die BahnTechnologie.
Die Diskussionen um Rollstuhl Gängigkeit der neuen Fernverkehr-Doppelstock- Triebzüge scheint kein Ende zu nehmen.
Es erstaunt mich wie die Behinderten Verbände der Rollstuhlfahrer wegen wenigen Millimeter erhöhter Rampen mit Forderungen vorstellig werden, die nur unter enormer Kostenfolge erfüllt werden können, oder technisch wegen beschränktem Lichtraumprofil der Wagen und anderen Rahmenbedingungen gar nicht möglich sind.

Nun, ich bin selber auch 'behindert' ( mag dieses Wort nicht ). Erlitt einen Hörsturz und bin seit 16 Jahren Gehörlos. 'Normale' Menschen und auch Rollstuhlfahrer können sich nur beschränkt vorstellen, mit welchen Barrieren und Hinderungen Gehörlose sich tagtäglich abgeben müssen. Bezogen auf Bahnfahrten entgehen uns jegliche Durchsagen am Bahnhof oder im Zug. Auch Erklärungen verständiger Mitreisender sind nur mit grösster Mühe mittels Lippenlesen oder Aufschreiben zu erhalten ( und abgesehen davon, dass man oft für dumm gehalten wird ).
Die Gehörlosen könnten nun verlangen, dass in allen Fahrzeugen und Stationen Bildschirme installiert werden und sämtliche Mitteilungen, unmittelbar, überall und jederzeit ersichtlich und gut lesbar dargestellt werden...
Das ist zwar technisch bestimmt machbar, aber ich finde der Aufwand wäre ebenso unverhältnismässig wie die ausufernden Forderungen der Rollstuhlfahrer.

Hinzuzufügen ist, dass viele der Rollstühle nun motorisiert sind und mühelos Steigungen und auch Schwellen wie sie bei den Bahnwagen beanstandet werden, überwinden können. Bei 'hand-betriebenen' Fahrzeugen, ist zudem bestimmt immer ein Mitreisender bereit Schub-Hilfe zu leisten, um ein Hindernis zu überwinden.

Anton Huggler, Bainbridge Island, USA

Sara Pasino
Sara Pasino SWI SWISSINFO.CH
@Anton Huggler

Hi Anton Huggler, thank you for your contribution and for sharing your experience. Do you not think that it is necessary to make trains more accessible in Switzerland? Introducing changes to the ramps and adding screens in all vehicles with constantly updated information could benefit many people with disabilities and lately there has been much discussion in Switzerland about Swiss Federal Railways' wheelchair tests. You can read more about it here: [url]https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/swiss-federal-railways-faces-criticism-over-controversial-wheelchair-tests/48818894[/url]

brunzlie
brunzlie

It is cheaper to take a bus from Lyon to Munich than from Zurich to Munich .
Transport in CH is a ripoff

Amethyst-Weissmies
Amethyst-Weissmies

If I have choice, I always chose Swiss train. High standard, time for reading books, enjoying view from window.
By plane we loose a lot of time: getting the airport, passing security, waiting for plane.
Certainly still Swiss train, with half price option, is the best solution.

brunzlie
brunzlie
@Amethyst-Weissmies

What about smokers lighting up on platform benches right next to non smokers ?
I even found a cigarette but upstairs on a Swiss train pushed into a window

sicurezzacs@gmail.com
sicurezzacs@gmail.com
The following contribution has been automatically translated from IT.

We have been visiting Switzerland by traveling with SBB for a few years now. After evaluating SWISS PASS discounts, we have found excellent reductions with "Half Price" and "Savings Tickets" offers. The cost of the season ticket is amply repaid.
I think SBB should offer more discounts with special passes, especially for travelers over 65 years old. It would besides reduce travel to and from airports by cars and consequent risks for people who are not very young. I consider the quality of SBB services not comparable with the bad transportation of low-cost flights.
I share the opinion of Mr. Mark Stenzler of Bern.
Simonelli C. Varese

Da qualche anno visitiamo la Svizzera viaggiando con le FFS. Dopo aver valutato gli sconti di SWISS PASS abbiamo riscontrato ottime riduzioni con le offerte "Metà Prezzo" e "Biglietti Risparmio". Il costo dell'abbonamento é ripagato ampiamente.
Credo che le FFS debbano proporre più sconti con speciali abbonamenti, soprattutto per viaggiatori/trici con più di 65 anni. Oltremodo ridurrebbe gli spostamenti da e per gli aeroporti con autovetture e conseguenti rischi per persone non giovanissime. Ritengo la qualità dei servizi FFS non confrontabili con il pessimo trasporto dei voli low cost.
Condivido l'opinione del Sig. Mark Stenzler di Berna.
Simonelli C. Varese

Anton W. Doos III, EDK
Anton W. Doos III, EDK

I traveled with my kids and grands this summer (7). We had a choice to fly from Bergamo to Zurich for under a 100 bucks compared to double that by train. with a bit of manouvering by passes etc that cost dropped $50. So that trip cost me still $400 more by train. We started out at 6AM and got to Luzern at 5PM vs 10Am & 2PM incl the train from Zurich. So the cost factor is certainly an issue but for travelers I would say its time.
Someone mentioned discount fares. Good buisness practice would dictate reduced prices during low passenger times. For us with kids the train ride was long yet much more educational than a flight. BTW since the rail from Valencia to Italy is lousy in regards to connections we did take a low cost flight! Terrible seating , lousy customer service!

Sara Pasino
Sara Pasino SWI SWISSINFO.CH
@Anton W. Doos III, EDK

Hi Anton W. Doos III, EDK, thank you for sharing your experience. Time is definitely another important factor to consider when choosing between trains and planes.

You're experience with trains from Spain to Italy does seem to confirm Switzerland’s reputation as a country of trains. In 2016, Switzerland had the highest average rail kilometres per person in Europe, followed by Austria, France and Sweden. You can read more about it here: [url]https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/society/all-aboard_swiss-take-the-train-more-often--and-further--than-european-neighbours/44453634[/url]

marco brenni
marco brenni
The following contribution has been automatically translated from IT.

Fortunately, the prices of air travel have gone up, and not by a small amount! Since airplanes do not pay at all for the pollution they cause, they should be taxed much more than they are these days all over the world. The clever (!) statistics of the airlines, claim that by flying, one would consume no more than traveling by car. This is perhaps only true for long distances (e.g. Zurich - New York) , but never for short distances. If one then changed the method of statistics, calculating hourly consumption (!) per passenger, the plane would ipso facto become the most polluting transport of all.
That being said, for European distances, rail travel should certainly be preferred, hoping that overnight travel, which was very comfortable, would also be reintroduced.

Per fortuna i prezzi dei viaggi in aereo sono aumentati, e non di poco! Siccome gli aerei non pagano affatto per l'inquinamento che provocano, andrebbero tassati molto di più di quel che accade oggigiorno in tutto il mondo. Le statistiche furbe (!) delle compagnie aeree, affermano che volando, non si consumerebbe di più che viaggiare in automobile. Ciò vale forse solo per le lunghe distanze (ad es Zurigo - New York) , ma mai per distanze brevi. Se poi si cambiasse metodo di statistica, calcolando il consumo orario (!) per passeggero, l'aereo diverrebbe ipso facto il trasporto più inquinante di tutti.
Ciò premesso, per distanze europee, andrebbe senz'altro preferito il viaggio su rotaia, sperando che si reintroducano anche i viaggi notturni che furono comodissimi.

Suze
Suze

Some budget air fares are cheaper than a half price day rail pass. Cf the cost of an SBB day pass with a single air fare to London, for example.

Danielbeccar
Danielbeccar
The following contribution has been automatically translated from ES.

I understand that trains are less polluting, is that so?

Entiendo que los trenes son menos contaminantes, es asi?

Andrea Roberto Parisi
Andrea Roberto Parisi
The following contribution has been automatically translated from IT.

Traveling by train in Switzerland is definitely the most convenient way, especially comparing it to traveling by air (sometimes lower costs but waiting times, mandatory check-in hours before departure and luggage restrictions) or by car (higher pollution, implausible speed limits, rising fuel prices). Ticket prices are consonant with the average Swiss wage. To be more competitive for European destinations, train frequency would need to be increased in addition to improved customer service (e.g., more streamlined handling of refunds, full or partial, for train delays and cancellations)

Viaggiare in treno in Svizzera è sicuramente il modo più comodo, soprattutto paragonandolo agli spostamenti in aereo (costi alle volte inferiori ma tempi di attesa, check-in obbligatorio ore prima della partenza e limitazioni di bagagli) o in automobile (maggior inquinamento, limiti di velocità inverosimili, prezzo del carburante in aumento). Il prezzo dei biglietti è consono alla retribuzione media svizzera. Per essere più competitivi per le destinazioni europee, occorrerebbe aumentare la frequenza dei treni oltre a migliorare il servizio clienti (ad esempio, gestione più snella di rimborsi, totali o parziali, per ritardi e cancellazione dei treni)

Sara Pasino
Sara Pasino SWI SWISSINFO.CH
@Andrea Roberto Parisi

Hi Andrea Roberto Parisi, thank you for your contribution. Despite the fact that Switzerland has a great reputation for its rail system, lately some Western Swiss cities have protested train timetable changes announced by Swiss Federal Railways (CFF/SBB). You can read more about it here: [url]https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/business/western-swiss-cities-join-forces-to-protest-train-timetable-changes/48495914[/url]

Mark Stenzler
Mark Stenzler

Rail travel is always my preferred mode of transport.
When traveling to neighbouring countries, I almost always opt for to travel by rail.

Living in Bern, the train station is easily accessible. The travel experience is not just the transport factor as the train allows me to read, picnic and converse easily with other passengers.

Train is always the way to go.

Amethyst-Weissmies
Amethyst-Weissmies
@Mark Stenzler

I agree, the best way of transport to neighboring countries is train. Fast, high standard, time used for reading or looking for beautiful nature around.

MVB
MVB
The following contribution has been automatically translated from ES.

Swiss trains are famous for their punctuality, comfort, reliability and, in general, for what the people who use this comfortable means of transportation are looking for.

The best way to maintain their service is by maintaining their quality. A family on a trip tends to prefer a train for its great advantages which are important to maintain in order not to lose customers.

The "Eurailpass" type offers, which used to be very convenient, are no longer available on the Internet.

Los trenes suizos son famosos por su puntualidad, comodidad, confiabilidad, y en general en lo que busca quién hace uso de este confortable medio de transporte.

La mejor forma de mantener su servicio es por medio de mantener su calidad. Una familia en viaje tiende a preferir un tren por sus grandes ventajas las cuales es importante de mantener para no perder clientes.

En internet ya no se encuentran las ofertas tipo "Eurailpass", las cuales resultaban muy convenientes.

Sara Pasino
Sara Pasino SWI SWISSINFO.CH
@MVB

Hi MVB, thank you for your contribution. Do you think that adding more daily offers and discounts would convince more people - especially families - to choose trains over planes?

gaz
gaz

I just returned from Switzerland we had traveled by train to Geneva then onward to marseilles then later to nice then back to geneva, anyhow my companion in her wisdom exited the train some number of stations before the destination on the way back to Geneva, fortunately there were still some railway people on the platform and having the situation explained to them they placed us on a last train to an interim station, they would contact the colleagues there and advise them of the situation and hopefully they could provide a solution, we arrived at the interim station and the staff were expecting us, they advised we could catch a tram but we had to hurry as the tram was about a kilometre away and we did not have a lot of spare time, so off we went and got the tram which delivered us to the Geneva station where we waited several hours until the airport was open, this is not the first time I have had pleasure of the exemplary and magnificent assistance from the swiss rail staff, over a couple of decades I've had to call on them to pull the proverbial rabbit out of the hat a few times, I would just say where on the earth do you get a level of service like that, only in Switzerland, im sure they fail, I mean everyone fails, but I tend to think, for every fail there is probably a 1000 go above and beyond examples of absolutely fantastic friendly helpful exemplary service

Peter Ern
Peter Ern
The following contribution has been automatically translated from DE.

We went on a "Eurail trip" through 15 European countries last late summer. Holland and Switzerland did best by "far" rail massively. And in addition there were decent discounts on mountain and special railroads. We came from Southeast Asia by plane. I think in Europe the train beats absolutely all air travel. - Stations are usually very central, short distances. - Trains run according to schedule several times a day almost everywhere. - In terms of price, however, the train would have to become even more competitive. Especially one-way tickets are too expensive. With our "Eurail Pass" 2 months 1st class we paid less than 1000.-- Euros per person. Really a fair price.
However, on very few routes, Zurich - Paris we still had to pay a supl. of about 30 Euros. But if you are "smart", you can visit almost all places in Europe with this European Rail Pass. But it is imperative that the railroads remain competitive with air travel. I also assume that the train is also more environmentally friendly.

Wir sind haben im letzten Spätsommer eine "Eurail-Reise" durch 15 europäische Länder gemacht. Holland und die Schweiz haben mit "Abstand" Bahn massig am besten abgeschnitten. Und dazu gab es auf Berg- und Sonderbahnen anständige Rabatte. Gekommen sind wir von Südostasien mit dem Flugzeug. Ich denke in Europa schlägt der Zug absolut sämtliche Flugreisen. - Bahnhöfe liegen meistens sehr Zentral, kurze Anfahrtswege. - Züge fahren nach Fahrplan mehrmals im Tag fast überall hin. - Preislich müsste die Bahn aber noch konkurrenzfähiger werden. Vor allem Einzelfahrkarten sind zu teuer. Mit unserem "Eurail Pass" 2 Monate 1. Klasse haben wir weniger als 1000.-- Euros pro Person bezahlt. Wirklich ein fairer Preis.
Auf ganz wenigen Strecken, Zürich - Paris mussten wir allerdings noch ein supl. von ca. 30 Euros zahlen. Aber wenn man "schlau" ist, kann man mit diesem europäischen Rail Pass fast alle Orte in Europa besuchen. Die Bahn muss gegenüber dem Flugzeug aber unbedingt konkurrenzfähig bleiben. Ich nehme auch an, dass die Bahn auch umweltfreundlicher ist.

Sara Pasino
Sara Pasino SWI SWISSINFO.CH
@Peter Ern

Hi Peter Ern, thank you for your contribution and for sharing your experience. Yes, train travel almost always comes out better than flying in terms of emissions. You can read more about it here: [url]https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/sci-tech/fasten-your-seatbelt--aviation-emissions-are-about-to-take-off-again/47715352[/url]

What was your experience with travelling from Switzerland to neighbouring European countries by train? Would you still prefer trains to planes?

Ueli Schwotzer
Ueli Schwotzer
The following contribution has been automatically translated from DE.

Even though I find this discussion very tedious by now, I will bring in my few points:
- if the comparison of operating costs were done honestly, air traffic would have no
as long as kerosene is not taxed, price dumping does not play a role.
role
- I can walk into any train station, buy a ticket and then 'speedily'
go
- for the flight many additional formalities and waiting time are needed
- the aura around flying is still overestimated
- WHO worries about the environmental impact of short flights?
- young people, especially in southern countries, do the math very well, they
rather take the train or even the bus, there is no money (Rome-Palermo €500!)
- Finally: we make ourselves crazy with criteria such as speed and (almost)
immediacy, without knowing the destination.

Auch wenn ich diese Diskussion mittlerweile als sehr bemühend empfinde, bringe ich meine wenigen Punkte ein:
- wenn der Betriebskostenvergleich ehrlich erfolgen würde, hätte der Flugverkehr keine
Chance, denn so lange Kerosin nicht besteuert wird, spielt das Preisdumping keine
Rolle
- ich kann in irgendeinen Bahnhof gehen, eine Fahrkarte kaufen und dann 'zügig'
losfahren
- für den Flug braucht es viele zusätzliche Formalitäten und Wartezeit
- die Aura um das Fliegen wird immer noch überschätzt
- WER macht sich denn schon Sorgen um die Umweltbelastung durch Kurzflüge?
- junge Leute, grade in südlichen Ländern, machen sich die Rechnung ganz genau, sie
nehmen eher den Zug oder auch den Bus, es fehlt das Geld (Rom-Palermo €500!)
- zum Schluss: wir machen uns mit Kriterien wie Schnelligkeit und (fast)
Unmittelbarkeit verrückt, ohne das Ziel zu kennen

enanablancaynumeros
enanablancaynumeros
The following contribution has been automatically translated from ES.

To combat climate change it is necessary to move passengers from planes and cars to trains and public transport in general.
The main obstacle is price, lowering it could offset the loss of revenue with higher passenger volumes. It makes no sense that traveling by car is still cheaper than by train.

The federal government should take more direct control of companies like SBB to promote these initiatives. As a society, we would save on health costs resulting from pollution and accidents, on maintenance of high-capacity roads for cars, which we pay for with everyone's taxes for the benefit of a small percentage of the population.

Severe climate change is at stake and private companies, unfortunately, cannot take on our aspirations and challenges.

Para combatir el cambio climático es necesario mover pasajeros desde los aviones y los coches hacia los trenes y el transporte público en general.
El principal obstáculo es el precio, bajándolo se podría compensar la pérdida de ingresos con mayor volumen de pasajeros. No tiene sentido que desplazarse en coche siga siendo más barato que el tren.

El gobierno federal debería asumir un control más directo de las empresas como SBB para promover estas iniciativas. Como sociedad, ahorraríamos en gastos sanitarios derivados de la contaminación y accidentes, en mantenimiento de carreteras de gran capacidad para coches, que pagamos con los impuestos de todos para beneficio de un porcentaje reducido de la población.

Nos jugamos un cambio climático severo y las empresas privadas, desafortunadamente, no pueden asumir nuestras aspiraciones y retos.

Sara Pasino
Sara Pasino SWI SWISSINFO.CH
@enanablancaynumeros

Hi enanablancaynumeros. Thank you for your contribution and for brining up the issue of the 'hidden' costs of transport.

Last year, the Swiss Federal Office for Spatial Development said in a report that traffic in Switzerland generated an average of CHF1,600 in so-called external costs per inhabitant. And polluted air resulted in 39,300 days of asthma suffered by children.

If you're interested in the topic you can find out more here: [url=https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/business/-hidden--costs-of-transport-total-chf14-billion/47709336]https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/business/-hidden--costs-of-transport-total-chf14-billion/47709336 [/url]

Marilyn Fluegel
Marilyn Fluegel

Train travel in Switzerland has always been my favorite part of European vacations. It was an added "plus" that my sister-in-law's Swiss relatives were wonderful hosts. My husband and I used Eurailpass and/or Swiss pass for transportation to many wonderful places, and preferred hikes in the Alps rather than visits to large cities.

P.S. I have not yet read your guidelines -- just noticed the "notice" re guidelines. I hope I have not broken the rules with my impulsive post above. I will soon be 91, so you can blame it on my senility. Wish I could visit Switzerland again!

Marilyn

Sara Pasino
Sara Pasino SWI SWISSINFO.CH
@Marilyn Fluegel

Hi MARILYN FLUEGEL, thank you for your contribution and for sharing your experience! What's your opinion about trains in Switzerland compared to trains abroad? Anything you particularly liked about Swiss trains?

Also, we do moderate comments according to our guidelines to foster a respectful and constructive discussion. So, for example, we will reject comments that attack others personally. Your comment does not violate our guidelines. You can find them here: [url]https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/terms-of-use/44141966[/url]

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