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Incendiary device found near centre where world leaders met

Police in canton Graubünden have found what appears to be an incendiary device hidden close to the conference centre in Davos, which houses the annual summit of the World Economic Forum.

This content was published on March 5, 2000 - 18:53

Police in canton Graubünden have found what appears to be an incendiary device hidden close to the conference centre in Davos, which houses the annual summit of the World Economic Forum. This year's event was attended by world business and political leaders, including President Clinton.

The Federal Prosecutor's Office confirmed a report in the weekly SonntagsBlick newspaper that a device had been found in an electricity sub-station about 200 meters from the centre. But a spokesman stressed that it did not contain any explosive materials and was not a bomb, as the newspaper reported.

He said it was discovered on February 25, shortly after the conference ended, and that it had been examined by explosives experts from Zurich. He said that on the basis of their report, the federal authorities had turned the matter over to local police.

Security was stepped up in Davos, following the violent protests at last December's meeting of the World Trade Organization in Seattle. There was no repeat of the violence in Davos, although hundreds of anti-globalisation activists did defy a ban on demonstrations, and vandalised cars and a McDonalds restaurant.

There was a scare several days before the event opened, when fireworks shattered windows at the conference centre.

From staff and wire reports

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