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Low-paid workers in Geneva to receive extra financial support

The long queues for food parcels in Geneva were seen as an indication of increasing poverty due to the Covid crisis. Keystone/Salvatore Di Nolfi

Voters in canton Geneva have decided to grant additional financial support to low-income earners hit hard by the Covid crisis.

This content was published on March 7, 2021 - 19:34
swissinfo.ch/urs

Nearly 69% of voters on Sunday came out in favour of a parliamentary proposal, rejecting a challenge by the right-wing Swiss People’s Party and the group, Geneva Citizens 'Movement, according to the cantonal chancelleryExternal link.

The opponents had argued that the financial aid was too generous and would attract potential welfare beneficiaries, notably illegal workers.

The aid consists of a maximum allowance of CHF4,000 ($4,295) per month and is aimed at people working in the events and theatre sectors as well as domestic workers on call who haven’t been able to receive financial help from the cantonal authorities.

The total cost is estimated at CHF15 million.

After the coronavirus-induced shutdown, images of people queuing for food parcels in Geneva caused a shock and attracted public attention in Switzerland and abroad.

No voting rights

Meanwhile, in a ballot in the mountain resort of St Moritz, voters threw out a proposal to give residents with a foreign passport a say in local matters.

Two-thirds of voters rejected the proposal by the local council and parliament, according to official resultsExternal link.

Only one in three municipalities in canton Graubünden grant foreign nationals the right to vote.

Seven of the 26 Swiss cantons, notably in the French-speaking part of the country, have introduced the right to vote on local issues.

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