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Second round of protests in Davos fails to materialise

Expected demonstrations at the World Economic Forum summit in Davos failed to materialise on Sunday. Security had been stepped up following an illegal protest the day before, but anti-globalisation protesters declined to stage a repeat performance.

This content was published on January 30, 2000 - 18:10

Expected demonstrations at the World Economic Forum summit in Davos failed to materialise on Sunday. Security had been stepped up following an illegal protest the day before, but anti-globalisation protesters declined to stage a repeat performance.

Police in Davos were expecting a repeat of Saturday's clashes, when about 1,300 anti-globalisation activists tried to march on the congress centre, where the summit is being held.

But in the event, the only protest activity on the streets was directed at the Iranian delegation to the summit, who were pelted with paint by four exiles, demonstrating against Teheran's human rights record. The four were taken into police custody.

What may have deterred anti-globalisation activists was the fact that the local authorities had given the go-ahead for demonstrations to be held on Sunday. Instead, the activists chose to make their views known the day before, when protests had specifically been banned.

A 70-strong professional army unit was deployed in the town to help local police cope with demonstrations.

On Saturday, two policemen were injured as protesters tried to get close to the congress centre. In the ensuing clashes, several cars were damaged and the windows of a McDonald's restaurant were broken.

The clashes coincided with a day-long visit to the summit by President Clinton.

From staff and wire reports

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