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Sergio Marchionne Zurich hospital treated Fiat CEO for over a year


University Hospital Zurich grounds

The grounds of the University Hospital Zurich

(University Hospital Zurich )

University Hospital Zurich, where Fiat Chrysler Automobiles founding CEO Sergio Marchionne died, says the manager had been under periodic treatment there for a "serious illness" for more than a year.

Marchionne died in Zurich on Tuesday at the age of 66 following complications from shoulder surgery.

“Although all the options offered by cutting-edge medicine were utilized, Mr. Marchionne unfortunately passed away. We deeply regret his death and would like to express our sincere condolences to his family,” University Hospital Zurichexternal link said in a statement on Thursdayexternal link.

The hospital did not elaborate on the nature of the illness or the treatment.

It added that medical confidentiality was of utmost priority, but that it had issued the statement in response to rumours in the media about Marchionne's medical treatment, “to prevent further speculation”.

Fiat reaction

Fiat Chrysler said it could not comment on the hospital's statement due to privacy laws. It added that the company "had no knowledge of the facts relating to Mr. Marchionne's health" beyond the surgery on his right shoulder that was previously disclosed, according to AP.

The company said it was first made aware last Friday that the 66-year-old Marchionne's health had seriously deteriorated and that he would not be able to return to work. The next day the board named a new CEO, Mike Manley.

Marchionne had a long association with Switzerland both in his professional and personal life, including having a residence in Schindellegi, a village above Lake Zurich. His surviving family are also said to live in French-speaking Switzerland.

AP/swissinfo.ch/ilj

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