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Fewer immigrants choosing to come to Switzerland

Immigrants make up over 17 per cent of Switzerland's workforce Keystone Archive

Switzerland is one of the few industrialised nations where immigration is falling, according to a new report from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

This content was published on January 23, 2001 - 14:12

The report, entitled "Trends in International Migration", says that apart from Germany, Switzerland is the only country in Europe where immigration is declining.

The report says that although Switzerland has one of the highest foreign populations in the OECD, at 19 per cent, the number of immigrants has been falling steadily since 1991.

Germany, the United States, Canada and Australia have also experienced falls in immigration, but the OECD says Japan and the rest of Europe have seen a steady increase in the number of new arrivals.

The report says the primary motivation for moving country is the desire of immigrants to join other family members.

It says most immigrants coming into OECD countries today are from Asia, and that fewer Europeans are choosing to move abroad.

However, most immigrants living in Switzerland are Europeans, with 38 per cent coming from neighbouring countries.

The report also details the proportion of immigrants making up the workforce in OECD countries. Just over 17 per cent of workers in Switzerland are foreign, compared with 57,7 in Luxembourg, 24.8 per cent in Australia, 19.2 per cent in Canada and 11.7 per cent in the United States.

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